Internet

Open source translation websites

When Danwei started in 2003, there were very few places online to find translations from the Chinese media. There now seem to be hundreds of bloggers, Net-heads and other obsessives translating all kinds of material and making it available online for free.

In the last month, two open source, free online translation websites have started, and both projects are well worth following:

Chinese Content
This is a wiki style website with numerous contributors (including Danwei writers). Contributors 'claim' articles for translation and then post the finished work on the wiki and on their own websites, though there are tentative steps toward more extensive collaboration and aggregation. Most of the contributors are native English speakers; the translated material covers a huge range of subjects. You can find the contributors' own blogs and websites by clicking on their names.

YeeYan
Most of the contributors appear to be native Chinese speakers with an interest in the Internet and technology. It's only been running for a few days, but there are already several interesting translations available.

Four other other excellent China media resources that you may already be aware of:

China Media Project
A project of the Journalism & Media Studies Centre at The University of Hong Kong, this website publishes translations from the Chinese media and original reporting and research.

Interlocals.net
Interlocals.net describes itself a "a website for the non-english speaking world to communicate with each other on their social, cultural, and political issues through the collective efforts of a group of media activists, in translating local news and debates into an international context". So far, Most of the site's content is related to Greater China. It features translations as well as original writing. 


Global Voices
A global blog aggregator and translator with a very strong China section.

ESWN
A one-man translation machine whose prolific output and massive range of sources leave most bloggers feeling inadequate.

There are currently 7 Comments for Open source translation websites.

Comments on Open source translation websites

Thanks for the plug, Jeremy. I just want to add one thing regarding YeeYan: there is an English-to-Chinese counterpart of the site which is located at www.yeeyan.com, this has been up and running for quite a long time and is regarded as one of the most famous E-to-C bridge blogs of mainland China (along with chn.blogbeta.com).

Thanks Jeremy for the Global Voices plug! :)

I started open source online community called Translators on Call... We speak 30 languages a few months ago. It has 220 members-language experts from all over the world. This community is based on the livejournal.com platform and as it is well known, livejournal.com has been blocked in China for the last few weeks. My efforts to get this site up and running have hit the "great firewall". cest la vie

Hi, Jeremy, What's the "open source, free online translation websites "mean? As I know, Yeeyan is not an open source website.

zhoucheng:

Perhaps I am misusing the trendy term "open source". What I mean is that they accept contributions -- as far as I know, Yeeyan is welcoming anyone to submit translations or join their team of bloggers.

Jeremy, you are right, anyone can submit translation at Yeeyan if register.

Open Source? I would like to recommend a website "WNMNA"
WE NEED MONEY NOT ART. It is a E to C blog.

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