Media regulation

On not talking about Christmas

santa_china.jpg

In the comments section of the Confucians vs. Christmas post, "cat" writes the following:

I got into work at CCTV-9 on Christmas Eve, my heart sinking when I remembered I'd be facing a stream of the same old "China is embracing Christmas" and "Santas on rollercoasters" stories that we dust off every year like old decorations that should have been given to a charity shop ages ago. But when I opened up the editing system on my computer, there was the glorious all-users message: "No reports with content about Christmas are to be included in any news broadcasts".

O tidings of comfort and joy!

Maybe we have the PhD students to thank for this merciful release. They came to save us all from Santa's power when we were gone astray.

Zeng Pengyu, a reporter at Beijing Youth Daily who blogs under the name "Xiao Fei Dao", writes about how the Chinese media handles this sort of advisory:

A holiday of self-deception

As in years past, the word "Christmas" (圣诞节) once again is not allowed to appear in news reports. In past years there were explanations for this - something like it being meant to protect national culture for example - but this year there was nothing. However, reports were prohibited all the same - can national culture be protected by banning reports of a foreign holiday?

This stuff became an "hidden rule" about six or seven years ago. Suddenly, one day, "Christmas" was exiled from the news sections of the media. The first year, the media was quite conscientious, and newspapers on 25 December had nothing to do with old Grandpa Jesus. Following close behind in exile was "Valentine's Day". At that time, a kind of blue rose called "Blue Charmer" (蓝色妖姬) was very popular, and on 15 February, you could see in every newspaper reports that "blue roses sell out," but not a word said why - it was a complete mystery.

Later on things were even more fun. "Christmas" couldn't appear, so intellectuals who enjoyed playing language games used another word, "Silent Night" (平安夜). If "Silent Night" were to be banned, then use "the night of 24 December" - ha! you'd have to have a lot of guts to ban that one, too, turning a year into 364 days - this is what's really meant by a "a long history, flowing far away from the source"....

When I flipped through the papers when I got up today [25th], all the papers were quite obedient - no mention of "Christmas" in the news section. But the advertising section of every paper had boxes aflame with Christmas celebration, and in some, the entire ad was just the line, "Enjoy a relaxing Christmas," with "Christmas" (圣诞) in larger type than the front-page headline. You had to laugh - the world may be fake, but it has its occasional genuine moments. The key is that this authenticity is hammered out with money.

As for Valentine's Day, hmm, let's not say anything about that, OK - in this day and age, a lover isn't necessary to celebrate Valentine's Day, and banning Valentine's Day won't necessarily bring about purity. At any rate, corrupt officials definitely have more lovers than us common folk.

Though they weren't in the pages of a newspaper, Christmas trees appeared in the halls of various work units; even the gate to my community had one. Looking around, it wasn't much special, and even if I wanted to join in the fun by celebrating Christmas, it wouldn't turn me into a foreigner.

And even those real foreigners - their president issues New Year's greetings to Chinese-Americans every year at the Spring Festival, but I've never seen us congratulate foreign citizens at Christmas. And now you can't even say the word - it really is tacky, and how we're always saying we're 5000 years old - a 5000-year-old going up against a 200-year-old, how lame is that?

Throwing in a popular expression, this is a matter of cultural self-confidence.

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There are currently 15 Comments for On not talking about Christmas.

Comments on On not talking about Christmas

Funny how "foreigners" automatically mean "Americans", as if they're the only ones who celebrate Christmas.

P.S. Congratulations are due to Danwei for being one of the few decent sites currently accessible on PCCW in Hong Kong!

That I didn't know! It's amazing how long some things can be right there in front of you without you ever noticing - until someone points them out.

Which reminds me... December 25 and February 14 are not the only dates that encourage calendrical creativity. There's another, more sensitive, date in the summer that can engender what would otherwise seem to be unusual references to the specific time of year. My favourite was some time around 2000, when Writers' Digest selected an extract from Deng Maomao's biography of her father for its front page story. It was the part about the April 5 Incident and the second sentence began with the words "On April 6". Now, how can you ban that? After all, the official verdict was reversed.

It is not a matter of cultural confidence, but a matter of cultural defense. Indeed I see no sense of Chinese people celebrating Christmas or Valentine's Day. Every holiday has a tradition and that tradition lays weight and meaning on that specific holiday. Most Chinese people are atheists, then why should Dec.25th be something special to them? If what they want is only festive celebration, then isn't the Chinese spring festival not good enough? As for Valentine's Day, we similarly have the Double seventh holiday for Chinese lovers to celebrate love. The editior here is totally speaking from a westerner's perspective. Of course, to ban the mentioning of Christmas is kind of stupid and lame, but that seems to be the only possible option for our government for the time being. I believe in the long run, debates over celebrating Christmas as has happened this year will put some sense into Chinese young people's mind and make them voluntarily give up celebrating an exotic holiday.

I like your website very much. Although I don't celebrate Christmas, we should not be so extreme.
I would say "merry Christmas" to people who have this festival.

Quote:
(It is not a matter of cultural confidence, but a matter of cultural defense.)

Well, according to your logic, Chinese people should not celebrate New Year’s Day, because it is also a western festival, right? What’s more, according to a matter of cultural defense, we Chinese people should not read books on communism in order to protect our Confucianism, right? Can it work?

Quote:
(Every holiday has a tradition and that tradition lays weight and meaning on that specific holiday. Most Chinese people are atheists, then why should Dec.25th be something special to them? If what they want is only festive celebration, then isn't the Chinese spring festival not good enough?)

If because Chinese people are atheists, they should not celebrate Christmas, why no one criticizes when western people in their home country celebrate Spring Festival? Isn’t Christmas good enough? What’s more, a lot of Chinese people are atheists, but they also celebrate the “Ghost Festival” on the fourteenth July in our lunar calendar. A lot of Chinese people are atheists, but they also go to temples or churches to visit or even join in all kinds of religious activities as some kind of cultural experience (文化体验). (我想这里的版主也不信道教。不过,如果他到香港黄大仙祠去游玩,估计他也会试试求签(祝版主一求就是上上签)和摸摸转运风车。 :-) )

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(As for Valentine's Day, we similarly have the Double seventh holiday for Chinese lovers to celebrate love.)
Yes, we have the Double seventh holiday for Chinese lovers to celebrate love, but we have almost forgotten it since the Cultural Revolution when our government asked us to “破四旧”. Why don’t you mention anything about our government castrates our traditional culture? In Hong Kong, Qingming Festival, Mid-autumn Festival and Chongyang Festival are all public holidays, while they are not in China mainland.

Hehe. Of course, Hong Kong people also celebrate Christmas and Spring Festival.

Quote:
(I believe in the long run, debates over celebrating Christmas as has happened this year will put some sense into Chinese young people's mind and make them voluntarily give up celebrating an exotic holiday.)

I still don’t understand why Chinese young people (in China mainland) should voluntarily give up celebrating Christmas. Should western people voluntarily give up celebrating Spring Festival, too? What’s more, I would like to ask what our government has done to promote our traditional culture among Chinese people?

studentyoung, I agree that it's lame to ban the mention of western festivals in newspapers, as it violates freedom of speech.

However, if you could make the case for atheists Chinese to celebrate Chrismas in China, then you could also make the case for athesits Chinese to celebrate the birth of Buddha, the birth of the prophet Mohammod, or even the fly spaghetti monster. The fact is that the only religious holiday that's celebrated by massive number of atheists Chinese is Chrismas, which commemorates the birth of Jesus Christ. This just doesn't make any sense.

Western festivals such as mother's day, father's day, labour day, children's day, and Gregorian calendar new years day are celebrated in China because the values they commemorate are universal. The root of Chrismas is the birth of Jesus Christ which is not a universal cause for celebration or commemoration.

Only a very small number of western people celebrate Chinese new year in western countries to the same extent as native Chinese, and Chinese new year is not a public holiday in western countries -- Chrismas is. If you could make the case for Chinese new year in western countries, you could also make the case for the Indian lunar new year, or the Japanese lunar new year, or the Aztec lunar new year. Have you ever seen Indians, Japanese or the Aztec people complain that their new year holidays are not celebrated in western countries?

It's wrong for our government to totally castrates our traditional culture -- every Chinese knows that. But promoting western culture is not the solution to restoring traditional Chinese culture.

Young Chinese people should learn to understand what they are doing before they act. If they make an informed decision to become Christians, then they should feel free to celebrate Chismas. But if they choose to remain atheist, then they should understand why it does not make sense for them to celebrate Chrismas.

ps - you really should get out of the whole Christmas=Christian festival line of thinking. Arguing that only Christians can celebrate Christmas is a bit dated no? It is a bit like arguing that one cannot send flowers on Valentine's day without accepting the life of St. Valentine.

Christmas is more or less a secular festival these days and if people in China would like to get involved and be part of a global holiday, then why not. I am interested though: exactly which part of your traditional culture is Christmas eroding?

ps. if enough people accross the world started to think that the birth of buddha or whoever was worth months of commercials and unabound consumerism, why would this be a problem and why would it matter at all whether all the people doing so were buddhists or not? On this and your 'public holiday' argument, I think your logic is a bit askewed. people like holidays; very few consider historical purism to be the main priority in celebrating these holidys (see valentine's day, halloween, spaghetti monster day)

Quote:
(Western festivals such as mother's day, father's day, labour day, children's day, and Gregorian calendar new years day are celebrated in China because the values they commemorate are universal. The root of Chrismas is the birth of Jesus Christ which is not a universal cause for celebration or commemoration.)
Yes, the root of Christmas is the birth of Jesus Christ, but can we say that Christmas only has religious meaning? Doesn't Christmas have the universal meanings like family reunion and sharing happiness with others at the beginning of a new year?

Quote:
(The fact is that the only religious holiday that's celebrated by massive number of atheists Chinese is Chrismas, which commemorates the birth of Jesus Christ. This just doesn't make any sense.)
Furthermore, I would like to point out that Sunday also has a root of Christianity, which is a religious holiday and public holiday that’s REALLY enjoyed by massive number of atheists. How do you think about it, ps?

I am sorry, ps, but I still don’t understand what you mean, “This just doesn’t make any sense”? I just know that everything in existence is reasonable. Could you please allow me to explain why you said, “The fact is that the only religious holiday that's celebrated by massive number of atheists Chinese is Chrismas, which commemorates the birth of Jesus Christ.” Chinese people nowadays have more chance to know more about western people’s life by watching TV programs, films and news, reading books or magazines, and even traveling aboard, plus Christmas’ the universal meanings like family reunion and sharing happiness with others at the beginning of a new year I mentioned above. Now, please tell me, ps, do the points above make senses now?

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(Young Chinese people should learn to understand what they are doing before they act. )
I think most young Chinese people understand the religious meaning in Christmas. Can we give those young people more freedom to decide what should or should not do, so that they can learn to act according to their OWN choice, especially things in daily life without a very clear line to define right or wrong? Our world is fast changing, so no one can tell young people what the future looks like, but they who will finally use their knowledge and judgment to face up to a fast changing world. If you say, “Young Chinese people should learn to understand what they are doing before they act”, can we say “Why not let young Chinese people have more freedom to practice how to make their OWN choices”, which, I think, is more meaningful than to tell them what should do and what should not do.

Quote:
(If they make an informed decision to become Christians, then they should feel free to celebrate Chismas. But if they choose to remain atheist, then they should understand why it does not make sense for them to celebrate Chrismas.)
I don’t know why atheists can’t celebrate Christmas. Do you mean atheists can’t join in any kind of religious activities?

Quote:
(But promoting western culture is not the solution to restoring traditional Chinese culture.)
My words in my previous post:
In Hong Kong, Qingming Festival, Mid-autumn Festival and Chongyang Festival are all public holidays, while they are not in China mainland.

I would like to say more on it. Qingming Festival, Mid-autumn Festival and Chongyang Festival have been public holidays since Hong Kong were still UK’s colony. Korean people celebrate Christmas, but they are also loyal fans’ of 《大长金》. Now, please tell me, ps, how do you think about it? If our government really wants to restore traditional Chinese culture among young people, it should create more free chance for them to come, to see, to be interested and to understand our traditional Chinese culture, but not just simply ban Christmas among them or criticize them for celebrating it.

(Quote: Well, according to your logic, Chinese people should not celebrate New Year’s Day, because it is also a western festival, right? What’s more, according to a matter of cultural defense, we Chinese people should not read books on communism in order to protect our Confucianism, right? Can it work?)
Since we Chinese have adopted the western calendar, then New Year's Day is no longer exclusively a western festival. If we people live and work mostly according to such a calendar, why shouldn't we celebrate the beginning of a new year? Similarly, it would make total sense for us to celebrate Christmas only if we had adopted their religion. As for your example of reading books on communism,(let's set apart whether China is still a Communist country) I think it's totally a different case. To read and to learn about something doesn't equal to do something after others. Reading involves critical thinking, that is, not buying all the book says. But to do something after others demands much more discretion. In most cases, it requires a same or similar motive as the people who you copy the deed from.

(Quote: If because Chinese people are atheists, they should not celebrate Christmas, why no one criticizes when western people in their home country celebrate Spring Festival? Isn’t Christmas good enough? What’s more, a lot of Chinese people are atheists, but they also celebrate the “Ghost Festival” on the fourteenth July in our lunar calendar. A lot of Chinese people are atheists, but they also go to temples or churches to visit or even join in all kinds of religious activities as some kind of cultural experience.)

Indeed having been in US for almost 2 years, I don't know anyone here would celebrate Chinese Spring Festival unless they're related to China in some way, e.g. they have a Chinese son-in-law or they're really into Chinese culture.I bet situation is the same in other western countries. And I want to say something about Chinese people being atheists. To my knowledge, though most Chinese are atheists, they more or less have some beliefs. Like the celebration of "ghost festival" and the drawing of lots when visiting temples are part of our traditional culture. To classify us as atheists, simply because we, unlike Christians or Muslims, don't have a symstematic belief in some specific figure,(like Jesus).

I do agree with you about our government destorying our traditional culture in the ten years' cultural revolution. That was indeed a dark period. But It was a past. As I said before, to ban mentioning of Christmas on newspaper and broadcasts sounds stupid and lame and may not be effective at all, but at least it shows our government has come to realize how badly Chinese young people have been assimilated by western culture. At least it shows our government has got the sense of revitalizing and defending our traditional culture.All I wanted to say that it is something worth recognized.

As for myself, when I am in US, I would celebrate Christmas with my American friends, out of respect and kind wish for them. But when in China, I don't think it makes sense for me to celebrate such a holiday.

Sounds like you People's Republic of China people need a new holiday. Why not celebrate the historical first and only appearance of China in the World Cup? After all, everybody knows China won't ever be in the World Cup again unless they are the host.
So let's make China's first appearance in the World Cup a national holiday, hao bu hao?
Now if I could only remember the exact date. Pardon me while I do some Baidu-ing...
Ah so! There it is! China played Costa Rica on June 4, 2002. So every year the sports pages of China's newspapers and CCTV news broadcasts should commemorate this popular date with banners heralding "Remember June 4!"

mike - Chrismas is a christian festival, that's a fact. Muslims don't celebrate it, Hindu Indians don't celebrate it, so why should atheists celebrate it? I'm only saying that it only makes sense for the Christians to celebrate the birth of their religious icon - Jesus Christ.

If you only care about the commerical aspect of Chrismas, then that just makes Chrismas even less relevant. If you just want to encourage people to spend, you can pretty much just make up another holiday. No matter how you present Chrismas, you cannot get away from the Christian religious views and traditions.

If enough Chinese became Christians or Buddhists, I wouldn't have any problem with their celebration of Chrismas or Buddha's birthday. The fact is that most Chinese who celebrate Chrismas are atheists, and it does not make sense for them to celebrate Chrismas. Why don't they celebrate the birthday of the prophet Mohammod?

If the Chinese just want a few more days off work, there are plenty of Chinese gods or historical figures to celebrate. So why Chrismas? Why a Christian holiday? Isn't China supposed to be a secular country?

studentyoung -- Chrismas has universal meanings like family reunion and other good human values, but so do other Chinese holidays like the mid-automne festival or Chinese new year. So I don't see what we would miss out by not celebrating Chrismas.

I don't think people enjoy Sunday because it's Sunday. People enjoy Sunday because they don't have to work. You cannot possibly compare the religious significance of the weekdays with Chrismas. The 7-day system is part of the modern calendar system and is used all over the world irrespective of religion. The religious aspects of Chrismas are only significant for people who are christians. They are not the same.

Not everything in existence is reasonable. Murders, wars, frauds, lies and superstitions are unreasonable. You don't always have to copy and imitate other people. You should only do it when it makes sense. Religions such as Islam and Buddhism have far more relevance with China than Christianity. 10s of millions of Chinese citizens have been muslims or buddhists for generations. I don't see massive number of Chinese celebrating the birth of Mohammod or Buddha. So why Chrismas? What's so special about a western/semitic religion that's existed in China only for around 100 years? If young Chinese just want to learn a new religion, why don't they learn the Hindu religions of India, or the Shinto religion of Japan? After all, we are a lot closer to India and Japan than we are to any western countrys, and both India and Japan are important trading partners.

Understanding other people's cultures does not mean you have copy their cultures in your own country -- unless it can bring unique benefits that your own culture cannot produce. Unless you can prove to me that the Chinese culture cannot encourage the same good values encouraged by Chrismas, you don't have a point for Chrismas. We don't want the world to be the same everywhere. Diversity is much much more interesting than uniformity.

Most young people in China live their entire lives away from religions -- they don't learn anything about religions in school, their parents, teachers and friends are just as atheist as they are. So how can they possibly understand the meaning of Chrismas and the nature and history of Christianity? The probability of a random young Chinese knowing the 10 Commandments of Christianity is probably lower than winning the lottery. This is my whole point: they are following an essentially random foreign tradition for no reason other than it's popular in the west. This is not how rational people behave. I'm totally not advocating for the banning of Chrismas or freedom of expression or worship. I'm advocating rational and logical thinking. A responsible person does not standby and let other people make their mistakes -- parents don't just let their children wander anywhere they want and eat whatever they want, governments don't let their citizens commit crime or be the victims of crimes (at least in theory). That's why you should speak out when you see people are doing something that doesn't make sense.

Atheism is the philosophy of disbelief or non-belief in the existence of a deity or deities. It is commonly defined as the positive denial of theism (i.e., the assertion that deities do not exist), or the deliberate rejection of theism (i.e., the refusal to believe in the existence of deities). An atheist practising a religious ritual on his free will makes less sense than a muslim celebrating Chrismas or the Easter holiday. It's not a question of "can" or "cannot", it's a question of "what's the point?". There is nothing wrong with an atheists wanting to observe Christianity or learning what it's about, but it just doesn't make sense for atheists to practise it. Why would you practise something that you don't even believe?

I don't understand your point with the mainland not treating the traditional holidays as public holidays. If you are saying that not making them public holidays is somehow diminishing their importance, then maybe you are right, and hopefully they will become public holidays later.

You cannot generalise an entire population. The Brits knew that HK was part of China and the residents of HK were Chinese, so what could they possibly have gained by forcifully banning the traditional Chinese holidays? Do you think that would have been a sensible thing to do? What on earth is the relationship between the celebration of Chrismas and fans of tv-show? Is Jesus somehow mutually exclusive with《大长今》?

The Chinese government is not banning Chrismas -- you don't see cops on the streets arresting people for doing shopping on Chrismas day, or shutting down businesses that display Chrismas decorations, do you? It's wrong for them to ban the use of Chrismas related words in publications, but is that the same as banning Chrismas altogether?

I totally agree that they should do more to encourage the good aspects of the traditional Chinese culture, and I think treating traditional Chinese holidays as public holidays is an excellent way to start.

Quote:
(And I want to say something about Chinese people being atheists. To my knowledge, though most Chinese are atheists, they more or less have some beliefs. Like the celebration of "ghost festival" and the drawing of lots when visiting temples are part of our traditional culture. )

Good! You mentioned visiting temples and drawing lots as part of our traditional culture, right? I would like to point out even Buddhism was imported from another country. Before we imported Buddhism from India, we had had no tradition to go visit Buddhist temples and had no idea of buddha. You see, sometimes our tradition creates in this way. I would like to say that tradition is not something static, but dynamic. It will change according to its social environment and conditions. Without change, we have nothing. Also, even learning is a course of change. If you didn’t have any change in your mind, you might have learned nothing.

Quote:
(Since we Chinese have adopted the western calendar, then New Year's Day is no longer exclusively a western festival. If we people live and work mostly according to such a calendar, why shouldn't we celebrate the beginning of a new year? Similarly, it would make total sense for us to celebrate Christmas only if we had adopted their religion. )

(As for myself, when I am in US, I would celebrate Christmas with my American friends, out of respect and kind wish for them. But when in China, I don't think it makes sense for me to celebrate such a holiday.)

Good! I am in China, but all my families have relatives and friends in Canada and US. I also have friends in UK. When Christmas comes, they will send us cards, give us a holiday call and sometimes even send some clothes or something else as a gift. Please tell me, whether I need to do the same for them, and whether my behavior should be counted as celebrating Christmas? In Cantonese area, people in a lot of cities and town like Zhongshan中山, Foshan佛山, Jiangmen江门, Chaozhou潮洲, 广州Guangzhou, have lots of relatives and friend abroad, especially in US, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Singapore etc. That’s why Cantonese area is called 侨乡. If what you say, “As for myself, when I am in US, I would celebrate Christmas with my American friends, out of respect and kind wish for them” makes sense, I would like to ask whether people here should celebrate Christmas? How about people who are in the same condition in other places?

What’s more, there are almost 200,000 foreigners living and working in Guangzhou, according to the figure reported in our local newspapers (sorry, I don't know the condition in Beijing and other cities), and many of them celebrate Christmas in Guangzhou, plus some foreign travelers. What if they invite their local Chinese friends to celebrate Christmas with them? Whether these invited Chinese people should or should not celebrate Christmas? If they can, why young Chinese students can’t do so? I bet that the same condition will happen in big cities like Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. I would like to point out again that even the tradition of visiting Buddhist temples is because we imported Buddhism from India and promoted it in many dynasties.

At last, I still don’t understand why in many people’s mind celebrating Christmas is the antithesis of promoting Chinese traditional culture. Why do Korean people Christmas while being loyal fans of 《大长今》, and they even promoting they traditional cultural world wide? In my opinion, celebrating Christmas is one thing and promoting Chinese traditional culture is another. Can we say if Chinese young students don’t celebrate Christmas, they will get interested in Chinese traditional culture at once? I think the key point on promoting Chinese traditional culture is how to make our young people get interested in, but not to tell them, “No, you should not celebrate Christmas.”

I agree with the question asked earlier, why does western imply America? Why is Christmas considered a western holiday? Did you know that the first Christmas actually happened in Israel? Is that considered the west? PS is right that you cannot separate Christmas from Christianity, yet there are thousands of westerners who celebrate Christmas without recognizing the true meaning of the holiday. So does that mean they shouldn't celebrate? Maybe but it hasn't seemed to stop them. Yes, America was founded on Christian beliefs but America did not create Christmas. God did that for us by sending Jesus to the earth. So if there are Chinese Christians who celebrate Christmas they should not be looked upon as those following a western tradition or festival but as people committed to their beliefs and to the God who send Life to them. To see Christmas as something western is just ignorance because it did not come from the west, nor is it only celebrated in the west. I cannot say this from research but my guess would be that Christmas is the ONLY holiday that is celebrated by at least some people in EVERY country in the world. So, is it bad for China to celebrate an international holiday? Yes, I'll agree the Santa Claus is western, but that tradition actually originated in Europe and I'd be happy if Santa was eliminated from Christmas because he only confuses people since he actually has nothing to do with the real meaning of the holiday.

Two things:
Firstly, festivals come and go. In New Zealand (where I'm from) lots of traditional Western holidays aren't celebrated any more. Most people don't even know when All Saints' Day is, or what Ash Wednesday means. New festivals, like the American version of Halloween have arrived from foreign countries. There's nothing that concerned nationalists or non-totalitarian governments can do about this. The point that it is wrong or stupid to celebrate festivals of another religion is just ridiculous. Most New Zealanders are atheists too, but Christmas is still the most important festival in NZ.
Secondly, telling people that Christmas is "un-Chinese" is not likely to be an effective way of stopping people from paying attention to it. I think the reason that Chinese people are often interested in Christmas is precisely because, to them, it represents Western culture, which is something they are interested in. When I lived in NZ, I used to be interested in Chinese celebrations of Spring Festival? Was this somehow wrong of me?

I see no problem with Chinese people celebrating Christmas despite not being Christians. As has been stated the true meaning of Christmas for many people in the west has been changed to a time for family bonding and reunions. I'm not arguing that Christmas therefore should replace the traditional Chinese festivals that celebrate the same thing, far from it, but the religious connotations of Christmas are far from clear in the modern world no matter what country you choose to celebrate it in.

QUOTE:
"probability of a random young Chinese knowing the 10 Commandments of Christianity is probably lower than winning the lottery". OK so I admit it is not that low in the west but I challenge you to go to England and find a young person celebrating Christmas who can do the same.

As for the comment about western countries not celebrating Chinese festivals unless they have some connection with China, case and point; me. I have celebrated the Chinese spring festival for as long as I can remember with my family and many others in England and they have no connections with the east (despite the fact that I now live and work in Guangdong). I defy you to go to any city in England during the spring festival and not find several places with people celebrating.

Also, Sundays ARE Christian. Sunday is the traditional Christian day of rest which has been adopted throughout most of the world. The Jewish day of rest is a Saturday and it is a Friday in Islam. I am not arguing that this is a good thing and that the world should adopt Christian traditions, merely questioning why you accept this yet question why Jewish/Hindu/Muslim festivals are not celebrated above Christianity.

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